research + cases

Teaching Cases

The Initiative's goals around research and curriculum are to create practitioner‐oriented research to help mayors and city leaders address issues that require innovative thinking and approaches, and to create a repository of teaching tools and online learning materials dedicated to improving professional practice.

All of the Initiative's curricular materials and research outputs will be made freely available as they are developed.

The research goals for the Initiative are threefold:

  1. Create new, usable knowledge about municipal governance, effective leadership, and innovative problem-solving in urban settings

  2. Consolidate existing knowledge and make the developing body of knowledge more accessible to current and future leaders in cities around the world

  3. Capture the new knowledge generated through the interaction between practitioners and academics in the Initiative programs

The Initiative intends to stimulate the design and production of curricular materials aimed to translate the most relevant and up‐to‐date knowledge about leadership, management, governance, and innovation in cities into active tools for teaching and learning. Teaching tools include concept frameworks on leadership capabilities, teaching cases centered around urban problem-solving, analytic teaching notes, and graphics to illustrate teaching concepts.

Below, find the Initiative’s research outputs and curricular materials that can be put to use by those working in or studying the field of city leadership.

If you're a faculty member interested in working with the Initiative to develop research or curricular materials, please contact us here or email cityleadership@harvard.edu. 

 
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“You Have One Hundred Days”: Accelerating Government Performance in the UAE

BY JORRIT DE JONG AND FERNANDO MONGE

Explores government innovation through the story of a program started by the United Arab Emirates government to spur projects toward faster, meaningful results.

Learning objectives:

Examine, compare, and contrast methods to promote and sustain innovation and continuous improvement in government.

Identify the conditions required to launch and make a Government Accelerators program thrive.

Discuss the pros and cons of using 100-day challenges for public sector innovation.

Identify the drivers of success for teams participating in 100-day challenges and the lessons learned by the Government Accelerators team from these experiences.

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Change at the Speed of Trust:
Advancing Educational Opportunity through Cross-Sector Collaboration in Louisville

BY GAYLEN MOORE, JORRIT DE JONG, PAUL REVILLE, LYNNE SACKS, AND ANNA BURGESS

Focuses on leading collaborative work in cities, through the lens of a Louisville group established by Mayor Greg Fischer and designed to improve educational outcomes.

Learning objectives:

Examine conditions and choices that foster and hinder cross-sector collaboration, and enable participants to recognize and differentiate common challenges.

Develop participants’ ability to imagine and understand the potential effects of alternative approaches to the problem.

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A Task Force with Teeth?
Driving City Performance in Lawrence, Mass.

BY JORRIT DE JONG, LISA COX, AND ALEX GREEN

Illustrates work by Mayor Daniel Rivera of Lawrence, MA, and his administration, to use data in decision-making around problem properties in the city.

Learning objective:

Examine the challenges of building capabilities for problem-oriented government action

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Design Decisions for Cross-Sector Collaboration

BY JAN RIVKIN, SUSIE MA, AND MICHAEL NORRIS

Highlight key design decisions made in the cases of five different collaborations (in Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio, Massachusetts, and Minnesota) to explore how to be effective if/when choosing to engage in cross-sector collaboration.

Learning objectives:

Examine the variety of forms that collaboration can take and the circumstances under which forms can create public value.

Enable participants to reflect on these forms of collaboration and challenges – and the extent to which they are fit-to-purpose.

Explore the full range of assets used to produce public value in a collaboration, including tangible and financial assets, regulatory authority, and moral suasion.